Dorkalicious

Cheers! (at Smith)

Dinner date with me love. (at Smith)

#cashhomie is so loved. #blinddog

The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.

Scott Woods (X)

he motherfucking dropped the truth.

(via mesmerisme)

THAT’S THE PRICE YOU PAY FOR OWNING EVERYTHING

(via queerfabulousmermaid)

this is a super important explanation to think about whenever you feel like telling someone that something isn’t racist because you don’t hate x person.

(via robotsandfrippary)

I probably reblogged in the past, but here it is again in that case.

(via feministdisney)

(Source: luvyourselfsomeesteem)

(Reblogged from lemonsweetie)
(Reblogged from five-for-silver-six-for-gold)
(Reblogged from violenceandlace)

Lunch of champions!

#tbt to my farm girl alter ego.

ancientart:

"They take first a crooked piece of iron, and with it draw out the brain through the nostrils, thus getting rid of a portion, while the skull is cleared of the rest by rinsing with drugs; next they make a cut along the flank with a sharp Ethiopian stone, and take out the whole contents of the abdomen, which they then cleanse, washing it thoroughly with palm wine, and again frequently with an infusion of pounded aromatics…" -Greek historian Herodotus describes the process of mummification in Egypt (trans. Rawlinson).

Shown here is an extraordinarily well preserved Egyptian mummy at the Louvre. This man lived during the Ptolemaic Period, and his name can be read as either Nenu or Pachery. The body has been sophisticatedly wrapped in strips of linen, and the mummy is covered with a cartonnage. Included here is a mask, an apron across the legs, and a collar over the chest.

Rigault Patricia from the Louvre provides the below description. This is only a section of the full write-up, you can read the rest here if you wish.

A body preserved for eternity

Not everyone in ancient Egypt had access to the funerary practices that ensured eternal life, and many people had to settle for a simple pit in the desert and a few modest offerings. For the more fortunate, preserving body provided an additional guarantee of survival in the afterlife. It offered a new support for the various elements of the living being that were dispersed at the time of death. Although the earliest mummies were little more than bodies wrapped in linen strips dipped in resin, more sophisticated methods soon developed; mummification procedures were highly perfected by the New Kingdom.

Although the number of mummies increased from this period on, the quality of the work tended to decrease. Nevertheless, mummies from the Greco-Roman period are often remarkable for the highly subtle designs formed by the interwoven linen strips. Depending on the period, a mummy could be covered a clothing, a net of beads, a mask, or a decorated wooden plank or cartonnage. During the Ptolemaic Period, various cartonnage elements were arranged on the mummy before it was placed in the coffin. 

Courtesy of & currently at the Louvre, France, N 2627. Photos by: Massimo Palmieri (1), Yann Caradec (2 & 3, cropped), and Oleg Ы (4).

(Reblogged from bunnicidal)

mdthwomp:

Unfriendly reminder that in America it’s reasonable to say an unarmed black kid deserved to be shot six times because he might have robbed a convenience store, but a white kid shouldn’t be kicked off the high school football team just because he violently raped a girl.

(Reblogged from bunnicidal)

luxhysteria:

Jupiter’s great red spot. A hurricane three times the size of our whole planet that’s been raging for centuries.
(Reblogged from bunnicidal)
organic-waters:

d-aisychild:

i-n-f-i-n-itebitch:

hellxiareblog:

rosalarian:

lenoralenoire:

This is really powerful.

Oh my god, this is such a perfect way to make a statement.

Reblogging this again because it’s so fucking good

this is fucking amazing

i’ll never not reblog

It is the civic duty of a female to reblog this, regardless of blog style.

organic-waters:

d-aisychild:

i-n-f-i-n-itebitch:

hellxiareblog:

rosalarian:

lenoralenoire:

This is really powerful.

Oh my god, this is such a perfect way to make a statement.

Reblogging this again because it’s so fucking good

this is fucking amazing

i’ll never not reblog

It is the civic duty of a female to reblog this, regardless of blog style.

(Source: stophatingyourbody)

(Reblogged from maddielyon)

thestraggletag:

egobus:

I want a movie about greek gods where hades isn’t the antagonist

By all accounts the antagonist in every Greek Gods movie should be Zeus’s dick. Nothing else causes as much murder and mayhem.

(Reblogged from bunnicidal)

#EditorialCartoon by John Darkow; “Racism in America”

(Reblogged from bunnicidal)